Pocket Market Toolkit

Section 1: Why Pocket Markets Section 2: About Pocket Markets Planning a Pocket Market Setting up a Pocket Market Information for farmers Links to resources

Pocket Market Toolkit Home

Section 3: Planning for a Pocket Market

Eight things to consider:

  1. 1. What is your primary objective for setting up a market?
  2. 2. What model best fits your purposes and FoodRoots' capacity?
  3. 3. Who will sponsor the market and be leading the charge?
  4. 4. Where and when will the market be held?
  5. 5. What about Rules and Regulations for markets
    1. 5.1 Zoning and Permits
    2. 5.2 Health Considerations and the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA)
    3. 5.3 Liability
    4. 5.4 Working with Minors
  6. 6. Promoting the Market
  7. 7. Assessing the feasibility of a market
  8. 8. Quicklinks: What do I need to know to plan a Pocket Market?

Whether you are considering a market for a community group and/or organization, neighborhood, office building, recreation center, educational institution, health care facility, senior’s center, housing coop, Condo Association, special event or whatever, there are some common questions to consider. Through answering the questions you will determine the goals for your market, what type of market you would like to have and establish the feasibility for success of the market. In addition through reading the following sections you will see if doing it on your own or having the support of FoodRoots is right for your purposes.

To help you better assess your needs and plan for a market please consider the following questions:

1. What is your primary objective for setting up a market?

There are many reasons for setting up a market. It is good to know what your primary reasons are to ensure that the end result meets the expectations of everyone. Here are some of the reasons people set up markets:

You may have all of these things in mind, but it is best to make sure you know what your priorities are as this will inform many of your decisions about the market. For example if building community connections and cohesion is key, the location will be very important. Is there a community hub you want to make more vibrant? If you are trying to create more foot traffic to a place or event, promotion will be key. If community economic development is important then creating a market structure that allows for a variety of marketing opportunities as well as locating the market in a highly visible and high traffic area will be important.

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2. What model of market best fits your purposes and FoodRoots' capacity?

As you will see there are many types of markets that can be held (single vendor, FoodRoots as vendor, hybrid FoodRoots and community market, multiple vendors- see Section 1) Some of the formats are more time and work intensive than others, some involve less or more involvement from the community, some more or less volunteers. If you are looking for simplicity, then having a FoodRoots Pocket Market is probably your best bet. If you have an energetic group who really want to encourage local entrepreneurship then setting up your own market may be better suited. Having the ability to access the Mobile Market Kit is another option that you might want to consider. With this kit you don’t need to invest in all of the equipment necessary if you want to “try out” a market, start up a market and build it over time, or if you are having one at an event.

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3. Who will sponsor the market and be leading the charge?

Who will be the main contact? Do you have some interested volunteers? Do you need to set up a committee to see it through?

If you want to host a market on public lands you will need to have permits and liabilty insurance, this necesitates that there be a “host” organization or legal entity responsible. Here are some examples of possible sponsors:

If you are a group that does not have a legal entity you may find an organization (non profit organization, business) that supports the idea and will work with you on the market and allowing you to use their insurance. If you are having trouble finding an organization, try contacting LifeCycles at 383-5800.

One person can organize a market, but it can be a lot of work. Bringing together a group, with a key contact is often a good way to get it done. The types of things volunteers can help with are:

If you are working with FoodRoots it is best to appoint one contact person as well it is great to appoint a volunteer who is designated to help with set up and take down on market day, as well as help answer any questions.

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4. Where and When will the market be held?

There are many factors to consider when it comes to time and location for the market. Below are some important things to think about.

Frequency and Duration:
Are you planning to have a market that is weekly, monthly, or is it a special event? Will it be seasonal or run year round? It often can take time for people to learn where a market is and when it will be there, so it is best if the time and location is set and promoted. Most markets are weekly allowing customers to do their shop as part of their weekly routine. Many markets are seasonal, that is they run from May or June to late October. It may be worth initiating a seasonal market, looking at demand and surveying customers to see if they would like a year-round market. Having a year round market also depends on appropriate space that is protected from the elements.

Time and Day:
Will your market be on a weekday or weekend? Will it be in the evening or during the day? How long will it be open?

Markets run on every day of the week, as well as at different times throughout the weekend. Having the market at a consistent time, day and place is important to build up customer habits. You have to train your customer! It may be best to look at who your customers are and find out what will work for them. A survey of potential customers can point you in the right direction. Consider what times people will be coming by and are convenient for shopping (such as on their way home from work in an office building, arriving home after work at a condo, or parents walking kids home from school). Are you looking to tie the market to promoting other things in the community? Then consider their timetables as well. Markets generally run 3-4 hours. It might be better to hold the market with longer hours at first to look at customer habits and peak times for sales, and then based on this, move to shorter hours.

If you are doing the market in conjunction with FoodRoots, it will be necessary to coordinate with the days and times of other markets in the network.

Location
We have all heard of the importance of "location, location, location!". For markets this is also very true. The location can really make or break your market. It is also important to go back to your key objectives for having the market. Do you want to draw people to a location or have the market in an area of high traffic flow? Here are some factors to think about:

Zoning: Is a Market a permitted use in the property zone? For more information see the section below 5.1 Zoning and Permits

Density of the Population: A market must have a population base that can support it. Unless you have a very keen interested group of customers, locating a market in a higher density area will give you more customers to reach out to and draw from. If you are choosing to try to draw people to a specific location, you will need to balance this with lots of promotion.

Visibility: Perhaps the most important thing to think about when choosing the site for the market is that people can see it. The more visible the market is to walk or drive by traffic, the more likely people will be to come. Choosing a site beside a busy walking or biking trail, street, or a community hub (like a community center or park) is a good idea. When indoors, picking a site where you can be seen is also important, for example a busy foyer is better than a room down the hallway.

Indoor or Outdoor? Markets can be inside or outdoors. Usually a market is more visible outdoors. Weather is an issue, especially at certain times of year. Some markets, such a Vic West, are outside in the summer and move indoors (Vic West goes into the YMCA) in the winter. If you are outdoors, tents can protect from sun and rain. If it is rainy or very hot think about placing the table well within the tent so that the customers can come in out of the rain or sun to stand and choose their purchases. Wind can be a problem too, make sure everything is secure. Also remember the sun goes down earlier as the summer turns to fall and you may have to adjust your closing time!

Traffic Flow: When placing the market stand it is important to think about traffic flow-foot traffic that is! This is important especially at a busy event. Make sure that the tent is not blocking any through ways or that customers would not be lining up across paths that facilitate flow, such as sidewalks.

Parking: Generally Pocket Markets are meant to be reached by walking and biking, however having some parking nearby is always an added bonus. There is the need to have access for the delivery truck that supplies the produce and equipment, and a place for it to park.

Water: There needs to be access to water for washing up but electricity is not needed

Bathrooms: Usually there is not a requirement to have a bathroom but it is always an added bonus. Sometimes a nearby business will agree to let customers or staff use the bathroom, especially if they may benefit from people coming into their store. Make sure to get permission before referring someone to a nearby bathroom and offer to ensure the bathroom is clean and tidy at the end of the market.

Considerate Location: Many markets depend on the good will of neighbors. It is important to make sure that traffic, customers, staff, and the equipment and signage is not a nuisance to either residents or businesses nearby. Make sure that it is always clean and tidy around the market, and that the stands or market traffic is not blocking businesses, lines of sight to businesses, or entrances. If you are situated inside an office building, recreation center, or an institution it is important to make sure that you have talked about the location and any security considerations. Often office buildings have security clearances and they are not accessible to outside traffic, ensure that rules around this are clearly understood and adhered to.

 

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5. What about Rules and Regulations for holding markets?

In general, if you want to hold a market you are required to fulfill some specific responsibilities, especially if the Market is on public lands. The following section outlines the different types of permits, licenses and insurance required, and where to obtain them.

Generally, to have a market, you need to cover the following bases:

See below for more detailed information on each of these points.

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5.1 Zoning and Permits:

Your first step is to determine if where you want to hold the market permits selling produce as an "allowable use" of the space. To do this you will need to figure out what Municipality you are in, as this falls under their jurisdiction.

The Capital Region is made up of 13 Municipalities and 3 Electoral Districts. Every Municipality has its own zoning, bylaw, permitting and licensing regulations. You will need to approach the municipality that has jurisdiction over the lands where you intend to hold your market. In most cases you will be directed to the planning department and you will need to:

  1. 1) Determine if a food market is a permitted use in the zone where you would like to locate the market
  2. 2) Obtain a Business License, the fee for this may be waived if the sponsor is a church or not for profit organization.
  3. 3) You may also require a special event permit

The reason for this procedure (obtaining the permits and licenses) is to ensure that all the departments involved are advised and consulted (these include: bylaw enforcement, parks, traffic control, and police).

Below is a list of the Municipalities and what we have been able to find out to date around their procedures for having Pocket Markets. Most Municipalities ask that you call them directly with questions. Some provided direct contacts (listed below). As there are more requests for Pocket Markets coming forward, some Municipalities are currently reviewing their policies. It is best to contact them directly for the most up to date information. Most will ask you to start by naming the location of where you want to hold the market and then they will be able to answer your questions more directly.

Municipalities

Central Saanich
Call 642-4444
Building and licensing
Mona Nicholson-Planning
Ken Nerader for Bylaws
544-4237

Colwood
Call 478-7516
Simon Lawrence-Planner

Esquimalt
Call 414-7100
Or Parks and Recreation Department
Eileeen Abbot 412-8513
Markets are allowable in Public Institution Zones-P zones (Public Buildings are an option, Town Hall, the Rec center, the Sports Center, and the Library). There are no commercial operations allowed in parks. On public lands a generic permit is issued outlining the time and place for community market. Some Zones permit temporary events -This would be under an Events permit.

Highlands
Call 474-1773
Laura Beckett-Planner

Langford
Call 478-7882
Planning Department
Generally to find out if a market is allowed in a certain zone, you will need to talk to the Planning Department. If you want to hold a market on a Municipal Property you will be required to obtain a Bylaw 33 permit which is issued through Engineering 474-0068. In a Park, you may not need to have a Bylaw 33 permit but obtain permission from the Parks Department and Engineering.

Metchosin
Call 753-6578
Laura Whitmore
Make a request in writing to:
4450 Happy Valley Road, Victoria BC V9C 373
If for a special event: Special Event Coordinator
Mary Giddenay. Must carry insurance.

North Saanich
Call -656-0781
Gary Joel

Oak Bay
Call 598-3311
Nigel Beatty Director of Building and Planning

Saanich
Call 475-5471
Planning Department
A market is currently only allowable in an A3 zone. If the stand is less than 129 square feet it may also be permitted in "A" zoned properties. A market may also be allowed in certain commercial zones "C". At present church properties are not allowed to hold a weekly market but may be allowed to hold a special event market with special permission. Call the planning department and speak with them about where you would like to hold the market. In Saanich you will need a business license to hold a market. S

Sidney
Call 656-1725
Development Services Department
In Sidney a market can be held on a commercially zoned property that allows retail sales. If the market is to be held on a property by anyone besides the owner, written permission needs to be granted by the registered owner. If you are looking at a market on public property then you would need to take a request to Council for approval. Markets would not be allowed on residentially zoned properties. In any case you will need a business license for the entire year.

Sooke
Call 642-1634
Marlaina Elliot-Planning

City of Victoria
The City of Victoria requires that a temporary market have a business license, a special permit license, and reviews the proposed location for a market on a case by case basis.

In order to hold the market on public lands, a special event permit must by held by a “host” organization, for example a community association or a service club. In order to have a special event permit on public lands you need to have your own liability insurance as well as have the city named as an additional “insured” on your policy. You are required to provide information on the number of venders, anticipated number of customers, times and dates as well as outline the possible impact on traffic. Another requirement is that you must conduct a Residents Notification.

In addition to this you will need a business license, the fee for this license may be waived if you are a non profit organization or registered charity. If you are doing it in partnership with an existing business that already has a license this may be able to fit under the existing license.

As these policies are currently under review, if you have questions or are thinking of a new location for a Pocket Market please contact:
Kathy Barlow
Coordinator/Office Administration/Special Events
Recreation and Community Development
361-0369
kbarlow@victoria.ca

View Royal
Call 479-6800
John Neil Planner

Electoral Areas

Juan de Fuca
Call 642-1500
Planner - Kristian Nichols, Manager, Local Area Planning

Southern Gulf Islands
Call 1-800-663-4425, local 3267

Salt Spring Island
Call 653-2075

The following links will take you to the municipality's own website for more information:

Central Saanich | Colwood | Esquimalt | Highlands | Langford | Metchosin | North Saanich | Oak Bay | Saanich | Sidney | Sooke | Victoria | View Royal

Electoral Areas

Juan de Fuca | Southern Gulf Islands | Salt Spring Island

What happens if having the market is not a permitted use in the property zone?

In this case you have a few options, the quickest route is to look for another suitable location that allows for a market stand. The second route is to have the site rezoned. This may not be a simple task as most properties are zoned in conjunction with Local Area Plans and Official Community Plans.

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5.2 Health Considerations and the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA)

The Environmental Health Officer of the Vancouver Island Health Authority department of Health Protection and Environmental Services oversees food safety at temporary markets.

In order to sell food (unless you are only selling fruits and vegetables) at a temporary market all food vendors must submit an "Application for the Sale Of Food At Temporary Food Markets" to VIHA.

You can find the application as well as the "Guidelines for the sale of lower risk foods, shell eggs and raw foods of animal origin" on the VIHA website. (Follow the link to see the guidelines and access the application format www.viha.ca/mho/food/ and click on the link to the GuidelinesSaleofFoodsatTemporaryFoodMarkets_Feb2007.pdf on the right hand side under "Additional Online Resources".

The Guidelines for the sale of lower risk foods, shell eggs and raw foods of animal origin state:

"A market manager (or equivalent) should be designated as being in charge of the overall market operation. Market managers are responsible for ensuring that food vendors have obtained approval from the local Health Authority, and not allow sales by vendors unless they have produced a letter of approval (see example – Appendix V). Other responsibilities of market managers should include:

1. obtaining approval from local/regional government to ensure compliance with local health, zoning, by-law and business license requirements,

2. ensuring each vendor has contacted the local EHO prior to the sale of lower hazard food and foods identified in Appendix III, including submission of applications (see example -Appendix IV) within time deadlines established by the local Health Authority. Generally applications should be submitted at least 30 days prior to commencement of the market/sales. The Health Authority will issue a letter of acceptance (see example - Appendix V) for all approved applications.

NOTE: Vendors who sell ONLY fresh whole fruits and vegetables are not required to submit an application, and do not require a letter of acceptance. Washing station(s) must however be supplied as per Section II.5 if samples are portioned/offered on site.

3. being responsible for ensuring all vendors are aware of all relevant policies and guidelines,

4. ensuring no home prepared higher risk foods are sold or offered for sale,

5. ensuring each vendor completes a list of foods to be sold,

6. maintaining a written record of all vendors and foods sold, and have such records available for review by local EHO, upon request,

7. being present and on-site at all times the market is in operation,

8. ensuring each vendor provides an acceptable means of hand and utensil washing (see Section II.5)."

Basically a Temporary Food Market is subject to the following conditions:

1. Home preparation of food must be carried out in accordance with the requirements of the Guideline on The Sale Of Home Prepared Lower Risk Foods at Temporary Food Markets. All foods must be properly packaged to protect them from contamination and should also be labeled.

2. No additional processing or preparing of the food is to occur at the market site without written permission from the VIHA office.

3. There is to be no change to the ingredients or preparation method of this product without written permission from our office.

4. A copy of your accepted application is to be kept available with you during any sales event to verify that these products have been reviewed by Vancouver Island Health Authority. 5. Vendors selling home prepared foods must post a clearly visible sign stating that “THIS FOOD HAS BEEN PREPARED IN A KITCHEN THAT IS NOT INSPECTED BY A REGULATORY AUTHORITY”.

For more information, visit the VIHA website or contact the
Environmental Health Officer
Vancouver Island Health Authority
Health Protection and Environmental Services
201-771 Vernon Avenue
Victoria, B.C.
V8X 5A7
Telephone (250)475-2235
Fax (250)475-5130

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5.3 Liability

FoodRoots has public liability insurance, and most community organizations also carry this type of insurance. It is possible if the market is a member of the BC Farm Market Association to acquire insurance as an associate. If you are holding the market on public property you may need to put the City on your policy. If you do not have insurance it may be best to partner with an organization that does.

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5.4 Working with Minors

If you are holding a market in facilities that hold children's programs you need to look into the possibility of anyone who works or volunteers at the market to have a Criminal Record Check. This would be locations such as Schools, Recreation Centers, or daycares. These can be obtained from the local police department and usually carry a small fee.

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6. Promoting the Market (signs, internet, newsletters)

Getting the word out about the Market is key to its success. Although word of mouth tends to be the best way to build up a customer base for a market, there are many other ways that will help spread the news.

In setting up the first Pocket Market, which is a community based market in Vic West, a weekly e-newsletter was sent to a distribution list. This reminded people of the market date, time and location, and what was going to be available, and is a very successful tool. The list grew as people who were interested forwarded it to friends in the neighborhood. This list has now grown to include the times, dates, and locations of all of the markets.

"By far the most effective and efficient way of advertising is through an email sent out each week". Susan Tychie

Other methods you might consider are

Make sure if you are planning on using posters and/or sandwich boards that they are allowed in the area you are holding the market (either on the street on in a particular building). Some of the municipalities have by-laws around placement of sandwich boards and some buildings especially public and office buildings have protocols for posting information.

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7. Assessing the feasibility of a market

It is important to decide what will be your measure of success for your market and whether this seems feasible to achieve. Is it most important that you have a high volume of visitors to the stand (community building and education) or that there are a high volume of sales? Setting some targets makes it easier to decide if you want to continue the market.

If you want the markets to stand alone, that is, not incur debt, it is important that the market revenues cover staff, produce and supplies at a minimum. You can be creative. Sometimes staff like to be paid in produce. Also it may be possible to set up in conjunction with a restaurant and sell them any excess.

In the start up phase, FoodRoots hopes that a market will cover the cost of staff, produce and supplies by the time it has been running six weeks. After this, it is important that the market begin to generate enough sales to cover these costs consistently as well as contribute to administration and overhead. A market should show an incremental increase in sales or that sales are not declining. In the start up phase a market will cost about $100 to run (staff time). Depending on the type of market, most markets need a minimum of about $400-$450 in sales for them to be viable.

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8. Quick links: What do I need to know to plan a Pocket Market?

Pocket Market "To Do" Check Lists

Checkmark
Setting up the Market
  What is the host organization?
  Who is the main contact?
  What is the primary objective and type of market you want?
  Information meeting with FoodRoots
  Determine the location
  Determine the time, date, and frequency
  Do you want to add other elements (educational information, traffic survey etc)?
  Is a market an approved use in the Zone it is located? (Municipal Jurisdiction)
  Do you need a Special Event Permit? (Municipal Jurisdiction)
  Do you need a Business License? (Municipal Jurisdiction)
  Do you have Vancouver Island Health Authority Approval for a Temporary Market?
  Do you need Insurance?
  Volunteers Working around Minors? Are Criminal Record Checks Necessary?
   
   
Checkmark
Promoting the Market
  Weekly email-Market time and location, what will be available and prices
  Posters and signs
  Signage on the day (sandwich boards etc.)
   
   
Checkmark
Operating the Market
  Volunteer orientation and check in
  FoodRoots on site
  Recycling and garbage receptacles out
  Signs up
  Information out
  Price lists up
  Check access and traffic flow
  Be a good neighbor
  Tidy up afterwards

Click here for printable version of these checklists.

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Photos of Pocket Markets

For photos of Pocket Markets, click here

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Pricing and Sample Price List

An objective for a Pocket Market is to ensure that farmers get a fair return for their work and products at the same time as ensuring that the retail price is acceptable to the community. FoodRoots uses a price list that is issued by Discovery Organics, which is an Organic Wholesaler based in Vancouver. Their prices are for organic goods that are listed at wholesale prices to retailers. FoodRoots pays the farmers the wholesaler’s rate which effectively works to knock out middle man on the farmers end. FoodRoots then adds a 33% margin to the price to cover staffing and equipment costs (similar to a retailer). In terms of pricing it depends on the type of product that is being sold ranging from conventional, transitional to natural to certified organic.

Pricing and Education

FoodRoots has set up an interesting way of displaying product prices. This is to bring more awareness to the customer about what is local and in season. The price list shows the product, unit, price per unit, and the source which is the farm or packer. All of the local and BC products are show in green and imports are shown in orange. All are certified organic except where noted.

Click below to see sample price and produce lists over the period of a year:

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Location

In terms of the location of the market, it is important to consider a number of factors:

Density of the Population: A market must have a population base that can support it. Unless you have a very keen interested group of customers, locating a market in a higher density area will give you more customers to reach out to and draw from. If you are choosing to try to draw people to a specific location, you will need to balance this with lots of promotion.

Visibility: Perhaps the most important thing to think about when choosing the site for the market is that people can see it. The more visible the market is to walk or drive by traffic, the more likely people will be to come. Choosing a site beside a busy walking or biking trail, street, or a community hub (like a community center or park) is a good idea. When indoors, picking a site where you can be seen is also important, for example a busy foyer is better than a room down the hallway.

Indoor or Outdoor? Markets can be inside or outdoors. Usually a market is more visible outdoors. Weather is an issue, especially at certain times of year. Some markets, such a Vic West, are outside in the summer and move indoors (Vic West goes into the YMCA) in the winter. If you are outdoors, tents can protect from sun and rain. If it is rainy or very hot think about placing the table well within the tent so that the customers can come in out of the rain or sun to stand and choose their purchases. Wind can be a problem too, make sure everything is secure. Also remember the sun goes down earlier as the summer turns to fall and you may have to adjust your closing time!

Traffic Flow: When placing the market stand it is important to think about traffic flow-foot traffic that is! This is important especially at a busy event. Make sure that the tent is not blocking any through ways or that customers would not be lining up across paths that facilitate flow, such as sidewalks.

Parking: Generally Pocket Markets are meant to be reached by walking and biking, however having some parking nearby is always an added bonus. There is the need to have access for the delivery truck that supplies the produce and equipment, and a place for it to park.

Water: There needs to be access to water for washing up but electricity is not needed

Bathrooms: Usually there is not a requirement to have a bathroom but it is always an added bonus. Sometimes a nearby business will agree to let customers or staff use the bathroom, especially if they may benefit from people coming into their store. Make sure to get permission before referring someone to a nearby bathroom and offer to ensure the bathroom is clean and tidy at the end of the market.

Considerate Location: Many markets depend on the good will of neighbors. It is important to make sure that traffic, customers, staff, and the equipment and signage is not a nuisance to either residents or businesses nearby. Make sure that it is always clean and tidy around the market, and that the stands or market traffic is not blocking businesses, lines of sight to businesses, or entrances. If you are situated inside an office building, recreation center, or an institution it is important to make sure that you have talked about the location and any security considerations. Often office buildings have security clearances and they are not accessible to outside traffic, ensure that rules around this are clearly understood and adhered to.

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Zoning and Related Municipal Regulations
See Section 5.1 - Zoning and Permits

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Health and Safety Regulations for Markets
See Section 5.2 - Health Considerations and the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA)

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Liability
See Section 5.3 - Liability

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Parking

Generally Pocket Markets are meant to be reached by walking and biking, however having some parking nearby is always an added bonus. There is the need to have access for the delivery truck that supplies the produce and equipment and a place for it to park.

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Promotion
See Section 3, #6 - Promotion

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Community Resources: Possible sources of funding and resources for markets

In setting up a market there are many ways to utilize resources in the community. It is important to always recognize (thank you signs?) these types of resources, as well as find ways to make the exchange win/win for both parties. Some community resources you could access that would help your market be a success are:

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Being a Good Neighbor

Markets depend on the good will of neighbors. There are some things about markets that can be of concern and in some cases points of conflict, such as, increased traffic, noise, strangers, perceived competition with other businesses, restriction of access to properties, and litter.

It is important to make sure that as a guest in a neighborhood or facility that the concerns of nearby businesses and residents are addressed. It is always important and in some cases required to notify surrounding neighbors of the desire to have a market and to ask them for feedback and suggestions. It is prudent to outline in the letter how some of the concerns that could arise will be addressed, to let people know that you are considering the needs of the neighborhood, and are taking steps to ensure that there will be little bother to them, and indeed there will be benefits!

Things to consider:

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Getting the Community more Involved and Connected

Holding a market can do a lot for community building and create better cohesion within various settings, communities, or neighborhoods. Having a central place that brings people together has many spin off benefits. It can revitalize a little used space as well as bring exposure to a place or program. It provides a venue for the community to get connected through being a place to meet and talk and “catch up”. Often in an office building the market can become the alternate “water cooler”. Providing a bench or a few chairs is helpful in this regard.

If the neighborhood needs to get input into a study (for example a traffic study or making a community map) it is a good opportunity to set up a table alongside the market.

Having a space for other community events and services to distribute information such as a table or bulletin board is also another service a market can afford that supports the local community.

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Opportunities for Education about your Local Food System

Pocket Markets offer lots of different opportunities to bring greater awareness and understanding of our local food system. FoodRoots holds a monthly feast featuring the food from local farms and processors available at the markets.

Here are some more suggestions:

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Next - Section 4: Setting up a Pocket Market

 

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